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  • International students in Dunedin get connected

    ‘Get Connected’ was a networking evening to launch the Job Ready Programme, which prepares international students for the transition from study to work through improving their skills and confidence in approaching prospective employers.

    Job Ready is a free, extracurricular programme designed for any tertiary international student studying in the Dunedin region. The aim of the programme is to give participants an in-depth understanding of working culture and expectations in New Zealand, and to help them develop skills that will aid them in New Zealand workplaces.

    “For many International students in New Zealand, networking is a scary and foreign business practice,” says Job Ready Coordinator, Madison Stumbles. “We wanted to create a new cultural norm – for students and businesses – where networking isn’t scary and international students have the confidence to engage with businesses looking to utilise the skills they have to offer.”

    The programme has been developed with the support of ENZ’s Regional Partnership Programme, Enterprise Dunedin, Otago Polytechnic, the University of Otago and the Otago Chamber of Commerce. 

    The event saw 15 international Job Ready ‘graduates’ engage with the potential employers in a positive and enriching atmosphere. The Minister of Immigration, Hon Michael Woodhouse, delivered the keynote speech and was joined by Education New Zealand’s Greg Scott and Enterprise Dunedin’s Export Education Coordinator, Sarah Gauthier and representatives of Dunedin’s international education providers.

    A strong turnout at the event demonstrated the level of commitment to international education in the city, and the strong understanding among all attendees of the way in which the Job Ready Programme can support local businesses in globalising their operations by creating links to skilled, international talent.

    dunedin2

    Job Ready Graduate with PhD student and AD Instruments representative, Pramuk Perera.

    About the programme

    In the lead up to the event, a pilot group of 15 international students from Otago Polytechnic and the University of Otago underwent the six-week intensive Job Ready programme.

    Confidence building was the main focus over the six weeks, with a strong emphasis placed on enabling the students to polish their professional networking skills. Several interactive seminars were facilitated by members of the Dunedin business and education community, with one popular session on ‘How to network’ led by Gallaway Cook Allan’s, Chief Executive Officer, Matthew Gorman.

    At the end of the six-week programme, students were proactively arranging meetings to talk to professionals with business interests in their field of study, and two had successfully secured employment for the following year.

    With more study ahead of them, the remainder of the students credited the Job Ready Programme with boosting their confidence in finding work in New Zealand after graduation.

    “I got what I needed out of this programme – confidence, knowledge [and] a better network of potential employers,” said one participant.

    “I would like to thank those who made this programme successful as it has given us a good insight into skills and abilities to work on, which are not usually taught in university,” stated another.

    Feedback from business participants was also incredibly positive. “I overheard Roger Belton from Southern Clams commenting on how these students were so capable, and on how they could help their businesses grow into new markets,” said Sarah Gauthier, Export Education Coordinator.  “He really enjoyed meeting the students and hearing how their international business skills and multiple language abilities would help his business grow into places like Thailand and Malaysia.”

    Local Dunedin businesses represented at the event included ADInstruments, Southern Clams, PocketSmith, Mixbit, Myth, Firebrand, ANZ and Cook Wong Accountants. There was also international business representation from the Carraway Group, a Hong Kong-based financial services firm.

    dunedin3

    Job Ready Coordinator Madison Stumbles with Minister Woodhouse as they presented each student with their frame able Job Ready completion certificate, signed by Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull.

    Next steps

    Planning for the next phase of the project is underway, with the next six-week programme being open to all international tertiary students in Dunedin and having an even stronger focus on engagement with local businesses.

    “I am really looking forward to see what phase two can do for Dunedin’s international students,” said Sarah Gauthier. “Secondary school engagement will be a priority and Job Ready intends to utilise the support received in the first phase to develop comprehensive material that will be applicable to all businesses and international students in New Zealand.”

    Think you’d like to do something similar in your region?  Sarah, Madison, and the Job Ready Programme partners are only too happy to share their learnings and provide hints and tips from their experience.

    Email Sarah in the first instance: sarah.gauthier@dcc.govt.nz

     

  • Japanese teachers visit New Zealand schools

    Participating schools had previously indicated their interest in New Zealand through a survey put together by Air New Zealand and ENZ and also attended a seminar prior to embarking on the tour.

    Japanese teachers were the focus for this familiarisation visit in recognition of the fact that they are among the key influencers, along with alumni and agents, for Japanese students and their families when considering international study locations. The word-of-mouth promotion of New Zealand as an education destination that comes from these visits is highly effective.

    The four-day tour started off with a visit to Rotorua where we visited the agrodome at the Rotorua English Language Academy to see the famous farm show, followed by a wonderful Māori experience at Te Puia. On the second day, despite the heavy rain, we received a warm welcome at Tauranga Boys’ College and Girls’ College, visited Hobbiton and enjoyed the experience of a Kiwi farm stay in Cambridge. The third day saw us visit the Waitomo glow warm cave and Waikato University, where the boys’ rugby team were hosted in July this year as part of the Game on English programme. The final day was dedicated to Auckland, where we visited Northcote College and Language International.    

    Participants were impressed by the quality of programmes and facilities offered by New Zealand schools and universities. The Cambridge farm stay in was also very well received by the teachers who considered it a uniquely New Zealand experience. Through conversations with teachers and counsellors, the Japanese teachers were also reassured by the level of support offered to international students in New Zealand. The group also had the chance to speak to some Japanese students and saw how well they integrate with New Zealand students in the classroom. A reflection of New Zealand’s emphasis on diversity, I believe. 

    With the growing demand from the high school sector in Japan, we were pleased to showcase New Zealand’s high-quality of education, along with the Kiwi lifestyle and cultural experiences. Following the trip Yamate Gakuin Junior and Senior High School in Yokohama has made a decision to send a group of students to New Zealand starting August 2016. Takigawa Boys' Junior and Senior High School in Kobe will also start offering a 3 months programme in New Zealand from 2018. 

    I look forward to facilitating more relationships between New Zealand education providers and institutions and agents in Japan in the coming year.

    I would like to sincerely thank all the institutions, local tourism offices and venues, and Air New Zealand for their support in making this programme a success.

    Misa Pitt

  • New Zealand on the road in Viet Nam

    The students were all treated to special presentations during the tour, with most walking away with an ENZ bag containing materials promoting New Zealand as an education destination.

    The purpose of the Roadshow’s education aspect of the was to raise awareness of New Zealand and drive registrations for the upcoming New Zealand education fairs on 3 – 4 October.

    This was very much an NZ Inc. initiative with ENZ, the New Zealand Embassy and Tourism New Zealand all working together to make the roadshow a reality. 

    A Māori cultural performing group from the New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute stole the show. 

    “Māori culture is a fascinating and unique part of New Zealand culture; it’s something that sets us apart from others,” said New Zealand Ambassador HE Haike Manning. “The visit by this performance group was a great opportunity to showcase Māori culture to Vietnamese students to raise their awareness and interest in our country,”

    “We took the opportunity to showcase a number of other things we think make New Zealand special – our excellent education system, our beautiful landscapes, our cities, our food – all the things that make New Zealand such a wonderful tourism and study destination! We also showcased our positive and growing relationship with Viet Nam, so that Vietnamese students could gain an appreciation of the cooperation that has being going on between New Zealand and Viet Nam over the past 40 years.”

    The Roadshow is the latest in a year-long series of events organised by the New Zealand Embassy as part of the ‘New Zealand – Open to the New’ season, celebrating 40 years of friendship and diplomatic relations between New Zealand and Viet Nam. 

  • Regional partners’ workshop goes to Hawke’s Bay

    The workshop is an initiative of ENZ’s Regional Partnership Programme (RPP), and drew a group of more than 20 regional coordinators from across the country. The RPP is a part of a strategic focus by ENZ to grow the value of international education across the whole of New Zealand as part of the effort to grow the industry’s value to $5 billion by 2025.

    “The aim of the workshop was for participants to share experiences and receive professional development to increase their effectiveness in working with education providers in their regions,” said Greg Scott, ENZ’s Regional Partnership Programme Manager.

    Topics included:

    • Product development

    • Inbound familiarisation planning

    • The upcoming regional digital resource

    • Increasing awareness of the value of international education in regional communities.

    Participants enjoyed a range of presentations including lively show-and-tell sessions from Education Wellington and Education Hawke’s Bay, as well as an update from Karen Chalmers, NZQA’s Director International and Policy.

    The day before the workshop, a smaller group of new regional coordinators came together at an ENZ-facilitated orientation session. They learned more about the RPP, contributed to an interactive business plan workshop, and heard some first-hand insights from Education Taranaki’s Rachael Berndt.

    Greg said feedback about both days was extremely positive.  

    “We've seen a good number of regions join the RPP over the last 12 months, and there is a significant increase in regional growth initiatives as a result of the formation and implementation of their strategies.”

  • Regional partners’ workshop goes to Hawke’s Bay

    The workshop is an initiative of ENZ’s Regional Partnership Programme (RPP), and drew a group of more than 20 regional coordinators from across the country. The RPP is a part of a strategic focus by ENZ to grow the value of international education across the whole of New Zealand as part of the effort to grow the industry’s value to $5 billion by 2025.

    “The aim of the workshop was for participants to share experiences and receive professional development to increase their effectiveness in working with education providers in their regions,” said Greg Scott, ENZ’s Regional Partnership Programme Manager.

    Topics included:

    • Product development

    • Inbound familiarisation planning

    • The upcoming regional digital resource

    • Increasing awareness of the value of international education in regional communities.

    Participants enjoyed a range of presentations including lively show-and-tell sessions from Education Wellington and Education Hawke’s Bay, as well as an update from Karen Chalmers, NZQA’s Director International and Policy.

    The day before the workshop, a smaller group of new regional coordinators came together at an ENZ-facilitated orientation session. They learned more about the RPP, contributed to an interactive business plan workshop, and heard some first-hand insights from Education Taranaki’s Rachael Berndt.

    Greg said feedback about both days was extremely positive.  

    “We've seen a good number of regions join the RPP over the last 12 months, and there is a significant increase in regional growth initiatives as a result of the formation and implementation of their strategies.”

  • Educational Publisher Export Growth Strategy

    838040 0013 Studyinnewzealand ThinkNEW 1

    New Zealand is small country that has had a large impact on educational developments worldwide. We are famous for the quality of our teachers, the progressive nature of our education system, and the innovative approach of our publishing sector.

    A proud history of exporting educational success

    New Zealand-designed educational resources have been used in schools around the world for over 40 years. Our curriculum, from early childhood right up to tertiary and vocational study, is valued and often adapted by other countries. Our test results have for many years been among the highest in the OECD nations.

    Dame Marie Clay’s leadership of the Reading Recovery approach led to a new export industry and revenues streams as the Reading Recovery movement spread to other English-speaking countries, notably the USA. With New Zealand publishers and educators in such demand a highly skilled publishing industry began, led by pioneers Wendy Pye and Joy Cowley.

    Over 30 active educational publishers offering you content and expertise.

    Today there are a large group of New Zealand publishers that offer a wide range of topics across early childhood, elementary, high school, tertiary and adult learning. The New Zealand educational publishing industry now serves more than 60 countries, across many languages, and includes much more than literacy publishing – extending to ESOL, science, mathematics, and innovative new digital resources.

    Major multinational publishers regularly commission NZ content creators to design new materials that will be released worldwide under their brand name. As a result, local publishers are highly flexible and customised in their publishing approaches, and able to produce materials that are culturally attuned to the intended market.

    A snap shot of NZ Educational Publishing

    Innovative ideas made in New Zealand

    • A pioneer in the design of effective educational resources
    • Over 30 active educational publishers
    • 30% of revenues gained from exports
    • Major provider of literacy materials to Australia, the USA, Canada, the UK and increasingly Asian markets
    • Many years of developing educational content for major multinationals: Pearson, McGraw-Hill, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Scholastic etc
    • Fast-developing digital publishing capability
    • The Big Book used for shared reading
    • The small book (8 and 16-page) used for small group reading
    • Reading Recovery – developed by Dame Marie Clay and her team
    • The Te Kohanga Reo movement developed for the preservation of New Zealand’s indigenous language and culture
    • Award-winning digital resources
    • Resources for disaster recovery

    Support programme

    ENZ partners with the Publishers Association of New Zealand (PANZ) to develop an export growth strategy, support access to markets and develop new markets. Examples include support for New Zealand’s Guest of Honour status at the 2012 Frankfurt Book Fair and the 2015 Taipei International Book Exhibition.  Information on the programme and tools can be found here:

    For more information contact Adele Bryant, Business Development Manager at adele.bryant@enz.govt.nz

  • Strategic Roadmaps

    The Strategic Roadmaps were developed in 2014 by New Zealand's international education industry to guide its future growth and success towards 2025. 

    The six sector specific roadmaps and one overarching industry roadmap reflect the culmination of nine months of industry effort to map out the ‘strategic choices’ and ‘specific actions’ which have been identified by each sector as key enablers of their future success.

    The roadmaps themselves were produced through a consultative industry-led process involving an extensive series of sector workshops, innovation cafes, and in-depth interviews with a large number of industry participants and experts. 

    ENZ was pleased to have been able to work with each sector to both prioritise the most important strategic choices for each sector and to support the implementation of a number of key strategic actions.

    In 2015 ENZ held a number of roadmap ‘pit stop’ workshops in Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch, and Dunedin to provide the opportunity to review the progress that has been made since 2014 towards industry’s international education goals and to re-prioritise future actions to sustain ongoing success. A progress update report was developed to summarise the progress that had been made. You can download a copy of the 2015 Progress Update here.

    Strategic Roadmaps

    The roadmaps contain a number of 'strategic choices' and 'specific actions' which have been identified as key enablers of future success.

    Download a copy of your sector's strategic roadmap below.

    Where to from here?

    A roadmaps analogy was used throughout this process because it was always going to be about the journey as well as the destination. Education New Zealand will continue to support industry to in their international education journey by:

    1. Working with providers, peak bodies, sector groups, regional bodies and other key stakeholders to widely communicate the sector and industry roadmaps.
    2. Working with each sector to develop a joint work plan that will identify what the highest priority projects are and who (industry, ENZ, or jointly) will lead them.
    3. Working with each sector to develop the detail of how each priority sector-focused project will be approached, what costs and benefits can be delivered, and when it can be delivered.
    4. Facilitating the establishment of a cross-sector project steering group to lead a collaborative approach to high priority roadmap projects that require a multi-sector or pan-industry approach.
    5. Working alongside each sector and the cross-sector project steering group to support the implementation of the agreed high priority roadmap projects for future years.

    Further information

    If you have any questions or feedback please email roadmaps@enz.govt.nz

  • Audience welcomed by kapa haka-NAFSA

    This year the conference took place in Denver, Colorado and through Education New Zealand’s (ENZ) stepped-up investment in the conference, an increased profile of New Zealand education opportunities was evident throughout the week.

    ENZ’s platinum sponsorship of this year’s conference provided New Zealand with a speaking slot for the New Zealand Ambassador to the US, Tim Groser, at the beginning of the opening plenary session, a 10-minute performance by Te Tini a Maui, a kapa haka group from Vancouver during the opening plenary, and the screening of a video about New Zealand education at all plenary sessions throughout the conference.

    NAFSA Ambassador Grosers images 1

    Other sponsorship benefits included the inclusion of flyers in the conference satchels and digital tote bags of the approximately 10,000 registrants, banner advertising in the online conference programme, and the opportunity to showcase New Zealand culture and education opportunities on the expo hall soundstage.

    The ENZ-sponsored opening plenary was a very proud moment for all New Zealand representatives, and NAFSA organisers said it would be a hard opening act to follow. A great kapa haka display prefaced by a heart-felt speech by the group leader about the importance of education and people, welcomed over 6,500 delegates into the conference theatre. Ambassador Groser’s speech had the audience in turns cheering (a thinly-veiled reference to Trump) and gasping (domestic fees for international PhD students in New Zealand).

    The increased New Zealand profile throughout the Expo was notable to New Zealand representatives and delegates alike. “NAFSA 2016 may well go down as the Kiwi NAFSA,” said Jason Cushen, Deputy Director International at the University of Otago. “Our booth was widely admired, the New Zealand function on the Tuesday evening was the talk of the conference, the kapa haka performances were show-stoppers and Ambassador Groser's address was well received. As an institution, the University of Otago, couldn't have been happier with how the week went.”

    ENZ will be a platinum sponsor of NAFSA 2017. If you are interested in discussing opportunities to attend next year’s conference, which will take place in Los Angeles at the end of May next year, please contact Amy Rutherford, Director of Education, North America.

  • New portal shows students around New Zealand

    The Study in New Zealand website will soon have a regions portal to show international students what it would be like to study, live and work in different parts of New Zealand.

    Students will be able to access information, search options, maps and interactive tools about New Zealand, which is divided into 15 regions for the purposes of this project.

    The portal aims to increase referrals from Study in New Zealand to institutions and regional cluster websites around the country.

    The Study in New Zealand website already has a New Zealand regions section showcasing tourism attractions, but it isn’t targeted to meet the needs and interests of students. The new portal, to be launched in July, will focus on letting students know about specific advantages of studying, living and working in each regions.

    Education New Zealand (ENZ) worked in partnership with our regional network of representatives to identify value propositions for each region. We also set up a Regional Reference Group, consulting the group at every stage of the project.

    The project is part of the Regional Partnership Programme, launched in 2013 to support the development and growth of international education in selected regions.

    It contributes to one of ENZ’s key Statement of Intent targets which sets out to ‘increase the proportion of international students enrolled to study in regions outside of Auckland’. 

    Our new regions portal taps into a trend highlighted in a recent ICEF Monitor article, which highlights that location is an important factor in the decision to study abroad.

    ICEF Monitor reported that international students considering an education institution look closely at the city or town’s key offerings including weather, cultural and recreation opportunities before committing to study there. The article used New Zealand as an example, referring to our ‘notable destination marketing-based campaign’.

  • Gambier Islands students ‘snowstruck’

    The 33 students and their guardians spent three days travelling from their home in Mangareva Island, the largest island in the remote Gambier archipelago, which is more than four hours’ flying time south of Tahiti, to reach Taupo.

    This remoteness means the Gambiers are known as 'the islands at the end of the world'. With a tropical climate, coral white sands, coconut palms, mountainous peaks and expansive fishing lagoons, the French-administered Gambiers are most famous for their black pearl industry. The 14 islands are also a popular sailing destination.

    Unaccustomed to Taupo temperatures, the group – a sizeable proportion of the entire 1530 Gambier population – had to borrow warm clothing from their homestay families when they arrived. There are no clothing shops and very few stores on their remote island. The teenagers quickly discovered Taupo's shops and got busy buying clothing and gifts to give to their families.

    As part of their two-week English immersion course, the students took part in activities in and around Taupo, including indoor climbing, meeting pupils from Taupo-Nui-a-Tia College and visiting a marae. The visitors could understand the Māori language, as their local Marquesan language is similar.

    However, the highlight of the trip was two days spent learning to ski at Happy Valley, the “magic carpet” learner slope of Whakapapa Ski Area on Mt Ruapehu near Taupo.

    Parents and teachers accompanying the group said Taupo Language School was recommended by Air Tahiti nui because it could offer the skiing and adventure activities, and the town is an easy and safe place to shop. They spent nine months planning and fundraising, although some expenses were subsidised by local government.

    One of the parents, Denis Salmon, said they were pleased with how much the students' English had progressed.

    "Not only have they become more independent and confident, but they now realise the importance of learning this language."

    Taupo Language School director Rose Blackley said attending multi-cultural classes meant the students made friends with Saudi, Chinese, Japanese, Thai and South American nationals.

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