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  • Diversity and inclusion in North America

    “Partnering with marginalised communities around us to confront harm in our past is something we all have to practise,” says course co-ordinator David Wick, Associate Professor, Middlebury Institute of International Studies.  

    "What was striking was that, from the first in-person meetings, everyone was willing to make personal connections to the content, share their own learning and vulnerabilities, and very curious as to how they can learn from one another to create better learning environments.” 

    Diversity Abroad, based in US, is the largest organisation focused on diversity, equity and inclusion in international education. ENZ works with Diversity Abroad on a range of initiatives, such as the annual Global Inclusion Conference, as well as partnering to deliver the specially designed course. 

    Attended by 18 people from NZ universities and ENZ, the three-month certificate course was fully online. Workshops, group discussion, videos, articles and assignments kept the participants highly engaged, and feedback on the course was very positive.

    Dr. Anna Foster, Study Abroad and Exchange Manager at the University of Canterbury, says the programme provided a comprehensive exploration of Access, Inclusion, Diversity and Equity (AIDE) in relation to student mobility. 

    “The programme was really valuable in gaining a deeper understanding of AIDE as it relates to Education Abroad, particularly due to the focus on considering every aspect of the student mobility journey in an end-to-end approach from the perspective of diverse cohorts,” Anna says.  

    “This has certainly influenced our team approach on an ongoing basis - it has shaped many of the continuing conversations we have around our outreach and processes, and has also helped us consider how we can further partner with both external and internal partners to better support our students. 

    “I think all of the group also found the programme to be impactful from a self-reflection perspective, prompting some really useful reflection on the backgrounds, biases and perspectives that shape each of us and how we can use this awareness as leaders and in our work with students.” 

    Anna also appreciated the practical focus of the course, and says her team is now considering some of the barriers to outbound mobility for diverse and under-represented cohorts, and working on strategies to address these. 

    Sarah Sung, Study Abroad Manager at the University of Auckland, also found the programme very beneficial.  

    “The programme has given me opportunities to delve into every single aspect of our team’s work through AIDE lenses as well as reflect on our past initiatives relating to diversity and inclusion. I learned that to make diversity work, AIDE should not be seen as a stand-alone project or matter but be embedded in our everyday life and all work,” Sarah says.  

    Sarah says AIDE conversations will be part of regular team meetings, as well as being integrated into team members’ KPIs and performance reviews, and she is working on a plan to increase participation from under-represented students.   

    “This includes extensive work in identifying opportunities to collaborate with partners for diversity and inclusion goals, reviewing our scholarship, communications and co-curricular programming for diverse students and developing a system for data collection.”  

    Lewis Gibson, ENZ’s Field Director North America, also took part in the course and says feedback from the cohort participants demonstrates the need for further AIDE learning in the New Zealand international education sector.  

    “Hearing from colleagues about the personal and professional measures they are actively putting in place to support under-served inbound and outbound students, as a direct result of this programme, is inspirational,” he said. 

    For more information about the International Education Diversity & Inclusion Certificate, contact Lewis Gibson at Lewis.Gibson@enz.govt.nz

  • Around the world in five - May 2022

    International 

    NZ: fully open on July 31 and post-study work reforms announced 

    New Zealand to continue below Year 9 recruitment as government backs down 

    NZ consults on new strategy and plans promotional tour of Americas 

    New Zealand aims for 'high value' and diversity in refreshed strategy 

    New Zealand international education renews outward focus 

    Chinese student flows tipped to peak within five years

     

    New Zealand 

    Chris Hipkins wants to diversify countries international students come from 

    International students group respond to 'backdoor to residency' comment 

    Long distance life: Three students navigating the pandemic far from whānau 

    International student market unlikely to recover quickly, agents warn

     

    Chile 

    Learn about the benefits of traveling to New Zealand with the visa to study and work 

     

    China 

    China: Could lockdown fatigue influence outbound student mobility? 

     

    India 

    India simplifies procedures for foreign institution partnerships 

     

    Thailand

    Invite English teachers nationwide to participate in a free webinar "Hybrid English Teaching Techniques to Be Easy to Understand and Effective". 

     

    United States

    Chris Hipkins wants to diversify the countries where international students come from 

    NZ consults on new strategy as gov’t plans promotional tour of Americas 

     

    Viet Nam

    New Zealand ready to welcome Vietnamese students back two months earlier 

  • Our board

    Steve Maharey | Chair

    Steve Maharey is an independent Director, commentator and consultant on a wide range of social and political issues. He was previously the Vice-Chancellor of Massey University. He is a former Member of Parliament and Senior Minister in the New Zealand Government (1999-2008). In 2009, as part of the Queen's New Year Honours List, Steve was made a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services as a Member of Parliament.

    Lyn Provost | Board member

    Lyn Provost was Controller and Auditor-General from October 2009 until 2017. From 2001 to 2009 she was the first female and civilian Deputy Commissioner of New Zealand Police. Lyn is currently a member of the International Auditing and Assurance Board. In 2016 she received the Global category award in the nationwide Women of Influence awards. In 2017, as part of the Queen's Birthday Honours List, Lyn was made a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to the State.

    Dr Linda Sissons | Board Member

    Dr Linda Sissons is a highly experienced chief executive in the tertiary education sector. Dr Sissons is currently the Acting Chief Executive at UCOL. She was also a member of the NZIST Establishment Board (2019-2020).

    Before that she was interim Chief Executive of Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre (2015-2016), Chief Executive of the Wellington Institute of Technology (2001-2015) and of Hutt Valley Polytechnic (1999-2001). In 2006, Dr Sissons was made a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to tertiary education.

    Rachael Tuwhangai | Board member

    Rachael is a descendant of the Tainui Waka and of Ngati Maniapoto. She is Co-Director of Maori and Pasifika Support Services (MAPSS) which focuses on the intersection between indigenous people’s and improving social outcomes. She is a former academic of the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Education; Education Manager of the Auckland South Corrections Facility, and a former Secondary School Teacher.

    Rachael’s governance experience includes:
    The New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA), Manukau Institute of Technology, The Auckland Museum, Voyce: Whakarongo mai, Variety Children’s Charity, Man Alive Charitable Trust, Auckland Community Law Centre and COMET Auckland.

    Daniel Wilson | Board Member

    Daniel Wilson started his career in Auckland as a music teacher.  After positions at several schools in Auckland and London, Daniel was appointed to the Leadership team at Manurewa High School in 2007, firstly as Deputy, then Associate Principal.

    In 2015, Daniel moved to Nelson to take up the position of Principal at Nayland College. Daniel has extensive knowledge of International education from a secondary perspective, with Nayland College hosting approximately 80 international students from around the globe in 2020. Daniel also has a very good understanding of a range of markets and marketing approaches, having overseen a 40% increase in International numbers since joining Nayland College.

    As well as leading Nayland College, Daniel is also the Lead Principal and Governance Chairperson for the Top of the South Trades Academy. He has also acted as a Regional Engagement Lead for the recent National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) review. Over the years Daniel has, and continues to work with various national and regional advisory groups. In his spare time Daniel is an accomplished brass musician, playing trombone in a variety of musical groups around Nelson and serving as President of Nelson City Brass.

    Ziena Jalil, Board Member

    Formerly an international student, Ziena is an award-winning business and public sector leader, with 20 years’ experience working in New Zealand and Asia. She consults on strategy and stakeholder engagement, and is a keynote speaker and commentator on Asia business, nation branding, leadership, and diversity, equity and inclusion. Her other governance roles include the Asia New Zealand Foundation, Unitec, Manukau Institute of Technology, DNA and the Cancer Society of New Zealand.

    Recognised by Campaign Asia Pacific as part of its 2020 Women to Watch, a group of 40 outstanding women in the Asia Pacific, Ziena has received several international awards for her work promoting New Zealand trade and education in Asia, and advises businesses looking to grow in the region. Her previous executive roles include Regional Director (South and Southeast Asia) for Education New Zealand, New Zealand Trade Commissioner to Singapore, and Head of North Asia Marketing and Communications for New Zealand Trade and Enterprise. 

     

  • Saying it with socks

    Back in May, we reported that Lincoln University had committed to providing international students with a parcel of hand-knitted woolly socks, pineapple lumps and a personal letter ahead of their arrival.

    These photos show that those socks have been a big hit!

    Lincoln’s International and Student Engagement Director Dee Coleman says that the university receives international students from over 60 countries each year, with some coming unprepared for a New Zealand winter down South.  To help them stay warm, Lincoln started the project to provide students with handmade woolly socks.

     “When we looked at our source countries, we realised that a lot of our students hail from warm climates and although intrigued by a Kiwi winter, can often come unprepared.”

    “Our aim is to keep them warm with some good, old-fashioned Kiwi hospitality, and what better way than with some homespun and hand-knitted South Island woolly socks.”

    Lincoln20Uni20 20Saying20it20w20socks2The socks are hand-knitted by a group of Darfield spinning and knitting enthusiasts, headed up by neighbours Pip Anderson and Ruth Buttle. They have committed to producing up to 40 pairs of hand-knitted socks a year for the university, destined for locations all around the world.

    Retired from a life of farming in the district, Ruth still spins her own wool despite no longer having a dedicated flock of black sheep for the purpose. She buys wool, cards it and spins it into double ply wool. It takes a minimum of two hours to spin one ball of wool.

    Pip says they are aiming to keep the colours neutral, with splashes of colour so that they look natural and hand made.

    Ruth says spinning and knitting are still popular pastimes for rural New Zealand women and that projects like this are an excellent opportunity to get together. 

    Socks story 3

  • New approach for Korean middle schools

    The Korean government wants to improve levels of student happiness, and move on from students validating their success and self-worth only in terms of academic performance. A priority is to support students to pursue “non-core learning areas” (such as music, arts, physical education, career exploration, club-oriented activities, etc). Each school will now designate a semester that is exam- and test-free to allow students to experience a wide range of these activities.

    This approach represents a big change in the Korean education environment. To date these students have relied heavily on simple memorisation and rote learning instead of thinking creatively or critically. The government now expects students to freely discover their competencies and capability, free from the stress associated with exams. Korean President Park Geun-hye describes this initiative as a “key task to fundamentally change Korea’s education system”.

    Under this new initiative, schools will teach students using diverse and engaging methods such as discussion, experiments, outdoor activities and team projects. Opportunities for students to engage with activities that may inform their thinking about future career options and/or future subject choices is also encouraged.

    The initiative began as a pilot in September 2013 with 42 Korean middle schools (1 percent of all Korean middle schools). It was expanded in 2014 to around 800 schools (25 percent), and to 1,500 schools in 2015 (nearly 50 percent). This year, all 3,204 middle schools – and their 1.5 million students – will implement this approach.

    Opportunities for NZ schools

    This new way of working not only requires a significant paradigm change in thinking for educators and parents, it also requires Korea to develop new infrastructure outside the classroom. It may therefore take some time to fully develop.

    This new initiative presents an opportunity for New Zealand schools; two groups of Korean parents may be interested in sending their children to study abroad during the exam-free semester:

    1. Families that wish to take advantage of the New Zealand curriculum, teaching expertise and existing infrastructure in terms of these broader subject areas (especially opportunities to learn outside of the classroom that are available at New Zealand’s intermediate schools); or

    2. Families that have a more traditional Korean academic education preference and wish to provide their children with an intensive learning experience (such as significantly develop their English language skills).

    New Zealand schools may therefore wish to reframe their marketing collateral for parents to demonstrate the strengths of their school’s programmes to deliver quality educational outcomes for Korean middle school students during these exam-free semesters.

    FAQs

    What age and year level are Korean middle school students?

    Students in Korea start school at age seven, rather than five, the usual age in New Zealand.  Korean middle school students are in years seven and eight and aged 13-14 years. The table below compares the age and year of the two school systems.

    What are the Korean school semester dates?

    Korean school year is divided into two semesters, running from 1 March to mid-July, and from mid/late August to February.

    Who decides which semester will be exam-free? Will it be the same semester for all schools in a region, for example? 

    Individual principals, in consultation with their school staff decide which semester will be selected as the ‘exam-free’ semester. This could be any semester between the first semester in the first year and the first semester of the second year.

    Korea graph

    Would this be an opportunity for students to spend the whole semester away from Korea, or are we talking about short (say 2-3 week or 4-5 week) programmes for groups?

    This will likely be predominately an opportunity for individual students to study for a full semester in New Zealand.

    That said, it is possible that schools with MoUs with Korean schools could promote an exchange or short course study abroad programme, but New Zealand schools who are interested in this should carefully canvas existing sister schools first to confirm whether this approach would meet the requirements.

    What does experiential learning mean in Korea? 

    The following four types of activities have been recommended by the Korean Ministry of Education:

    • Topic of interest: students choose topic(s) of interest and participate in a programme of activities around the topic, such as: entrepreneurship, design, animation, film, barista skills, smartphone app development, robotics, cooking, science etc.

    • Arts and physical education: students undertake activities that are not part of their regular school curriculum such as: participating in a musical or in a band, curating, industrial design, or physical education activities such as sports leisure industry experience or exploring career options around soccer, dancing etc.

    • Club activities: student clubs can be organised by students around topics of interest. These could be linked to other activities such as sports, career or volunteering such as a hospital volunteering group of 20 students who go to local hospitals to help out.

    • Career: students discover what employment options await; giving a chance for them to begin thinking about the sort of work they would like to do in the future and to gather information that will help them make good decisions about the courses they will undertake when they enter secondary school. This could include going into workplaces to experience, observe etc. and could also include a career counselling component.

    The New Zealand curriculum, teaching techniques and education outside of the classroom experience and infrastructure appears to be a good fit with this initiative.

  • Planning for success in Taranaki

    The Taranaki International Education Strategy was launched by Minister Joyce in New Plymouth on Tuesday 23 February, when he announced that the government is investing $162,000 in the initiative over two years, through the RPP.

    And, the news of the launch reached China!

    A partnership between Venture Taranaki and local education providers will allow the group to share resources and make strategic and targeted investments. It will also enable collateral and pathway products to be developed, agent familiarisation visits to take place, and make it possible for the region to be represented at the Australia New Zealand Agent (ANZA) Workshop on 13 – 15 April 2016.  

    Minister Joyce’s visit to Taranaki sends out a strong message that international education in New Zealand’s non-metro regions is high on the agenda.

    The government has committed an additional $2 million in 2016/17 to ENZ’s RPP for supporting growth initiatives in the regions. The additional funding is to build on the successes in 2015, with 11 out of 14 regions experiencing an increase in international student numbers.

    The RPP will support the implementation of growth projects involving our regions outside of the metro centres. As announced previously in E-News, three new Regional Project Managers join our Business Development Managers in supporting regional growth initiatives: Sahinde Pala, based in Auckland with a focus on the regions north of Taupo; Jo Keane, based in Wellington and supporting our central regions from Taranaki to Nelson Marlborough; and Sarah Gauthier who will manage a range of pan-regional projects including New Zealand’s regional presence at ANZA, the development of an online regional resource and an agent familariisation programme.

    For more information about ENZ’s RPP contact Greg Scott, Programme Manager Regional Partnership: greg.scott@enz.govt.nz  Phone: 64 3 3795575 Mobile: 64 21 2422868

  • Chile announces 500 more ‘penguins’

    In the last edition of International Education News we reported that Chile’s Economy, Development and Tourism Minister, Pablo Longueira, had announced that the pilot scheme for the ‘Penguins without Borders’ scholarship programme that brought 40 Chilean students to New Zealand in January, would be widened to 100 for terms three and four of this year.

    Things have progressed since then, with Minister Longueira announcing during his current visit to New Zealand that 500 more ‘penguins’ (so called, due to their distinctive black and white uniforms) are coming to New Zealand.  The first group of 250 ‘penguins’ arrives in July to live and study in towns and cities around New Zealand for two semesters. A further 250 will arrive in January 2014.

    New Zealand was the only country chosen to pilot the scholarship programme, but this announcement may help secure New Zealand’s place as a regular destination for these high-achieving students.

  • Get ready for unprecedented profile of NZ education in China

    We also need to make a leap in scale.

    We can’t do that with a business as usual approach.

    This realisation is behind the Dragons in a Distant Land documentary now set to screen before 650 million people in China from August 2013.

    The documentary highlights the experiences of Chinese considering studying in New Zealand and of successful alumni who have returned to China.

    Education New Zealand (ENZ) General Manager of Marketing and Channel Development Kathryn McCarrison says the two-part documentary (renamed from Dragons in the Land of the Long White Cloud) is designed to be a “game changer” for New Zealand’s student attraction marketing in China and will boost referrals to Chinese agents and New Zealand institutions. The documentary seeks to capture parents’ attention; students aged 16-25 will be targeted by a digital campaign.

    “We’ll get unprecedented coverage of New Zealand education in China with the documentary.

    “We all need to get ready – the Chinese networks will only give three days’ notice of the first on-air date.

    “To get full value out of the investments in the documentary, we – that is ENZ and the industry – need to run an integrated campaign leveraging each other’s work.”

    ENZ is developing marketing materials to help institutions plan their marketing in China following the screenings of Dragons in a Distant Land on national and regional television.

    These materials will be made available to institutions.

    ENZ’s production company, the Gibson Group, is negotiating with Chinese networks to have the documentary screened in August. The associated student dragons’ marketing campaign will be ready on 1 August 2013 to support the launch of the documentary.

    Key features of the campaign include:

    • Using alumni and agents on Weibo (the Twitter of China) to post about studying in New Zealand and direct people to the campaign’s website

    • Creating posts for targeted internet forums and bulletin board sites

    • Posting content to Youku, the YouTube of China.

    To directly engage the target audience – parents, prospective international students and education agents - there will be:

    • Video advertising targeting social networking and video sites and  top student portals

    • Performance display advertising.

    ENZ’s current Baidu search campaign will be reconfigured to ensure relevant searches are directed to the student dragon’s campaign website.

    Kathryn says the traffic from the student dragon’s campaign website will go to the New Zealand Educated website. “Your information on it will likely be the first impression of your institution for many Chinese visitors. 

    “We recommend you check out your institution’s page on newzealandeducated.com very soon to ensure your content is up to date.”

    Closer to the launch date ENZ will make available key messages for each episode, press releases, a media question and answer and photography from the documentary. The final media buying plan, showing when and where ENZ will be advertising in China as part of the campaign, will also be available to help institutions with their own media buying.

    A drop-box folder has been set up to access these materials when they become available. Email Deena for details. She will keep you posted on developments through e-news.

  • Understanding Indonesia’s education market

    Every year, more and more Indonesian students look to further their studies overseas. There is an awareness of the need for a better quality of education and the current circumstance in Indonesia is that facilities and quality education are somewhat still below expectations, especially when compared to abroad. International schools based in Indonesia also take a part of the increasing number of Indonesian students looking for an international education. After finishing at these high schools with an “overseas” qualification, these students usually opt to pursue their tertiary study abroad.

    With the number of Indonesian students choosing to go abroad increasing each year, why has New Zealand not truly benefited? It is simply because of the lack of information about New Zealand and the perception that New Zealand is a very quiet country with more sheep than people. We in Indonesia seldom see advertisements about New Zealand or the institutions while other countries have put lots of effort in branding their country and their institutions consistently. People are all the same. We tend to remember products that have a strong branding.  So, if you want people to always remember your product, you need to keep reminding people by persistently branding your product to the market.

    At first, I had the same perception of New Zealand being quiet too. Joining the May 2013 trip was my very first time to see New Zealand. I was so excited.

    I got a chance to visit representative institutions in Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. In the South Island, my first destination was Christchurch where I found lots of major work to rebuild and renovate its buildings.

    The first day touching down in Auckland, and seeing the city itself, changed my perception. Auckland is not as crowded as in my country, Indonesia, of course. But it is not as quiet as what I thought! The city has everything that a student needs - shops, cafes, restaurants, flats, shopping centres and even the education institutions are all within walking distance.

    New Zealand is such a perfect place to study. You have everything in town, people are so nice and friendly, and it’s very safe. I don’t need to worry about pick-pockets or drunken people when walking with my female friends back to hotel at night.

    After seeing these cities, and visiting various institutions, I also found that New Zealand has a great education system. Students are taught in a very practical way, both, in high schools and tertiary institutions. And this is what New Zealand needs to show. You need to educate the Indonesian market about this and change the perception of New Zealand.

    Indonesian families are unique. They have a strong family relationship. Their children’s study destination is also influenced by their relatives and friends. Parents feel more comfortable about letting their children study in a country where they have relatives or friends staying. Most of the time, the experience and opinions from their relatives play a great part in their decision. Apart from that, Indonesian parents will usually send their children overseas after they graduate from high school. They believe at this stage their children are mature enough and can take a good care of themselves overseas. Therefore, tertiary education is more attractive to the Indonesian market.

    Recently, the postgraduate market for Indonesian students has also been growing significantly. For postgraduate students, study duration, value for money and the opportunity for job placement are the key areas they are usually looking at. Little do they know that New Zealand offers a postgraduate job search visa and the opportunity to work and stay in New Zealand after they graduate.

    So, by understanding Indonesian market better, I believe institutions can plan a better strategy for their marketing activities. Together we can promote New Zealand as one of the top destinations for Indonesian students to consider as a study destination.

    Key points:

    • New Zealand has a low profile in Indonesia

    • To change this we need persistent and consistent marketing in Indonesia

    • The Indonesian market is primarily a tertiary education market, but there are opportunities for other sectors

    • The postgraduate market is growing significantly.

    SUN Education describes itself as the “most complete” International Educational Consultancy firm in Indonesia, providing the largest selection of quality education and country destination under one roof with its main focus being Australia, Singapore, UK, USA, Malaysia, New Zealand, Switzerland and Canada. Suwarni has more than eight years of student recruitment activity and currently works with 10 countries including New Zealand.

    Suwarni Puspita, Branch Manager, Mal Ciputra, with Indonesia’s SUN Education Group recently took part in a visit to New Zealand with other education agents from Indonesia. She offers some impressions of the opportunities and challenges for New Zealand institution, and in particular tertiary institutions, in Indonesia.

  • Strong team established in South East Asia

    It was first time everyone in the South East Asia team had been together in one location and it was a great opportunity for the them to work on the business plan for the coming year.

    Three areas of focus were identified during the planning sessions; first, delivering great marketing events (such as those recently held in Indonesia and Malaysia and soon to be held in Thailand and Viet Nam); second, introducing New Zealand institutions to potential partners and facilitating business development. Opportunities currently being explored in this area include early childhood education in Indonesia and Borneo; vocational education in Viet Nam; and English language opportunities in several countries. The third area of focus is leveraging Government connections and relationships.

    Also over the two days, the team spent time working out the best way to ‘pitch’ New Zealand as a destination for tertiary education to students at selected schools in all countries of focus. The first task was to identify which Year 8-10 students and parents would consider New Zealand as an education destination, and what types of schools they were at; and then, how the team could most effectively raise awareness of New Zealand education as a study destination among this group. The South East Asia team will be trialling a pitch in selected schools soon, and awareness-raising activities of this sort will become an important part of their job at the conclusion of the fairs.

    Many of you will already know some of the team – but perhaps only as a voice over the phone, so the accompanying photo shows, from left to right: Sarah Gauthier, ENZ’s Wellington-based International Market Manager who supports South East Asia; Izak Human, ENZ’s Regional Director – South East Asia; Margaret Low (Malaysia), Yenny Chen (Indonesia); Gewalin (Nan) Lertrasameewong  (Thailand), Dinh Duong (Viet Nam) and ENZ General Manager – International, Peter Bull.

    Yenny and Dinh are new to the team and next month Dinh will be in New Zealand for the first time. During her stay in New Zealand, from 10–18 October, Dinh is hoping to gain as much understanding of New Zealand education as possible and would very much like to meet education providers and visit schools and other education institutions

    If you would like to meet Dinh and show her what New Zealand can offer Vietnamese students, or discuss your plans for market development in Viet Nam, please email Sarah Gauthier: sarah.gauthier@enz.govt.nz(Note: due to itinerary constraints, we may not be able to honour every request, so please understand if we are unable to visit you – but rest assured that we will do our best!)

What's in it for me?